Chronology

Russia and India signed an international agreement on cooperation in the construction of 4 additional units at Kudankulam, as well as on the construction of nuclear power plants according to Russian projects on new sites in India
05.12.2008
The end of the strategic offensive arms reduction period under the Treaty on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START I Treaty)
05.12.2001
The Treaty on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START I), transformed by the Lisbon Protocol of 1992 comes into force
05.12.1994
The adoption of Memoranda on Security Guarantees on the part of Russia, the U.S. and the UK. The memoranda are needed because of Ukraine, Byelorussia and Kazakhstan joining NPT.
05.12.1994
Ukraine joins the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty as a non-nuclear weapons state.
05.12.1994
A U.S. sea-borne aircraft with an atomic bomb onboard crashes 200 miles from Okinawa.
05.12.1965
The first world nuclear propelled surface ship, the icebreaker Lenin, is commissioned.
05.12.1957
France sets up an atomic bomb development committee within the Commissariat for Atomic Energy.
05.12.1956

PIR Center Blog

03.12.2019

The debate on strategic stability and its prospects has been gaining momentum within the Russian academic and expert communities for the last couple of years, which is not surprising given the fact that the whole of the international security architecture is under extensive pressure. Traditional arms control treaties previously regarded as a critical instrument of ensuring strategic stability are on the verge of collapse. The system is under double blow. First, rapid technological progress blurs the distinction line between nuclear and conventional weapons, thus increasing the risk of escalation. Secondly, the global security landscape is becoming increasingly multilateral, thus making the traditional bilateral track less relevant – at least, for the United States.

21.11.2019

In preparation for the 2020 NPT Review Conference, one inevitably has to face a question: how to reinvigorate the review process, taking into account both the 1995 decision on strengthening of the review process and a quarter-century experience in between 1995 and now. 

18.11.2019

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference kicks off in less than 6 months’ time. Both Russia and the United States are on the final stretch of their respective preparations for that key international security event. Our two countries bear special responsibility. First, the Treaty designates them (and the United Kingdom) as the NPT depositary states; they are the guardians of the Treaty’s letter, so to speak. Second – and most important – between the two of them, Russia and the United States control over 92 per cent of the world’s nuclear weapons, thereby retaining their status as nuclear superpowers. Of course, the world has changed since the NPT entered into force back in 1970. Some superpowers have collapsed, only to be succeeded by others... but in nuclear matters, the bipolar world order has not changed much since the Cold War. In an era of dangerous erosion of international norms, the NPT remains the cornerstone of the global security architecture. Are Russia and the United States ready to work responsibly and cooperatively for the sustainability of the Treaty?

06.03.2019

The OSCE Ministerial Council held in Milan, Italy, on 6-7 December had not promised any breakthroughs in the politico-military dimension and its outcomes were predictably modest. The only document related to this domain (or, in traditional terms, to the “first basket”) that was adopted was the Declaration on OSCE Efforts in the Field of Norms and Best Practices on Small Arms and Light Weapons and Stockpiles of Conventional Ammunition. Apparently, this subject is uncontroversial enough to be the common denominator for the 57 OSCE participating states.

09.11.2018

From the point of view of regional security, disruption of the INF Treaty is dangerous to Russia since Ukraine still retains the potential to produce intermediate and short-range missiles and will no longer have constraints under the treaty. This may add further fuel to tensions between Russia, European countries and the United States.

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