Experts

  • Position : Consultant
  • Affiliation : PIR Center
  • Affiliation : Director General, Group-IB
  • Position : Director
  • Affiliation : Information Culture
  • Affiliation : Head of Strategic Projects, Kaspersky Lab
  • Position : Director
  • Affiliation : PIR Center
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PIR Center’s Experts Spoke at the Round-Table on Countering High-Tech Crime

17.12.2015

MOSCOW, DECEMBER 21, 2015. PIR PRESS – “We want our law-enforcement to work effectively and efficiently, to respond to growing risks, which have not been comprehended fully, in a situation where no proper steps to achieve information security are being taken. In most cases public authorities are unable to timely address challenges that arise when the explosive development of new technologies occurs, private sector often reacts faster” – Alexei Kudrin, head of the Civil Initiatives Committee.

On December 11, 2015, the Civil Initiatives Committee (CIC) held a round-table on High-Tech Crime: new challenges for society, state and private sector. The head of the CIC, Alexei Kudrin, moderated the discussion. PIR Center and the Digital Russia became partners of the event conducted under the umbrella of the Open Police project.

PIR Center’s experts of Working Group on International Information Security and Global Internet Governance: Alexandra Kulikova, Alexei Lukatskiy, Ilya Sachkov, Mikhail Yakushev and Andrei Yarnykh participated in the discussion on the challenges that the high-tech crime throws down to the law-enforcement agencies. The event was attended by representatives of the Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs, who delivered their presentation, namely advisor to the Minister of internal affairs Vladimir Ovchinsky, an expert of the Working Group on the reform of the Ministry Elena Larina and the chairman of the Public Council at the Ministry Anatoly Kucherena. Alexey Knorre, a research associate in the Institute for the Rule of Law (European University, Saint-Petersburg), Ivan Begtin, the Director of the non-profit organization Information Culture and a CIC member, Alexei Yatsyna, expert on business operations systems, and Maria Shklyaruk, a research associate in the Institute for the Rule of Law, commented on the reports and presentations.

Alexei Kudrin underlined that fighting high-tech crime has long been beyond the capacity of the law-enforcement agencies. “We want our law-enforcement to work effectively and efficiently, to respond to growing risks, which have not been comprehended fully, in a situation where no proper steps to achieve information security are being taken. In most cases public authorities are unable to timely address challenges that arise when the explosive development of new technologies occurs, private sector often reacts faster” – the head of the Civil Initiatives Committee said.

The CEO and founder of the Group-IB company, member of the PIR Center’s Advisory Board Ilya Sachkov made a presentation on the scale of financial cybercrime: according to a research made by Group-IB, annual turnover of the high-tech crime in Russia and the CIS countries amounts to over 3 triillion roubles. The expert points out that the main problem is that the society does not understand what the cybercrimes are and does not fully believe it their reality. On the other hand, law enforcement authorities cannot efficiently fight criminal groups that are scattered in several countries without unless legal framework in this area is harmonized. “When states do not have a harmonized legal framework, cooperation between law enforcement authorities takes days, months and years” – highlighted Ilya Sachkov. According to the cyber-criminologist, uniform rules or even a convention adopted on the platform of the United Nations are needed to facilitate coordination between law-enforcement agencies.

The importance of the international cooperation was also highlighted by the advisor to the Russian Minister of internal affairs, a famous criminologist Vladimir Ovchinsky. He presented the existing frameworks of different states law enforcement networking in cybersecurity. “Fight against high-tech crime requires greater international cooperation. Participating in coordination of trans-national investigations conducted by such organizations as the Interpol Global Complex for Innovation that opened this year in Singapore and the Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre could be very important in this respect. For Russia, an important basis for international cooperation is the Cooperation Agreement of the CIS member-states on fighting crime in computer information, as well as Cooperation Agreement on international information security of the SCO member-states” – the former Chief of the Russian Interpol Bureau concluded.

Alexei Lukatskiy, a Security Business Consultant at Cisco Systems, member of the PIR Center’s Advisory Board, mentioned that not only financial crimes deserve attention& So do other new phenomena including the Internet of Things. At the moment, attacks on internet-connected gadgets are not very widespread, but in the future, according to the expert, they could become quite dangerous. “We are talking about crimes committed using high-technology, they are irritating but not yet deadly. But some crimes can entail harsh consequences including fatal injury. For example, one could think of cyber attacks on cardiac pace-makers, insulin pumps, special medical equipment for asthmatics that are often Internet-connected. Almost every Western car including those assembled in Russia are equipped with high-profile electronics that, in particular, can be gotten through internet” - Alexei Lukatskiy told. He pointed at major efforts that have to be undertaken along with establishing cooperation between the executive and legislative branches to make sure that the level of information security of marketed products is properly assessed (more on the topic in the article by Alexandra Kulikova “Internet of Things: virtual welfare and real risks” (Russian only)).

Full expert statements at the round-table will be published in the coming issue of the Security Index Journal No. 4 (115), Russian Edition.

For questions concerning the Security Index journal, please contact the Editor-in-Chief Olga Mostinskaya by telephone +7 (495) 987 19 15 or by email at mostinskaya at pircenter.org.


   

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