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  • Position : Analyst
  • Affiliation : Institute for International Studies MGIMO University
  • Position : Consultant
  • Affiliation : PIR Center
  • Affiliation : Chairman, International Union of Veterans of Nuclear Energy and Industry
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Nonproliferation education in the report of the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters

18.10.2017

NEW YORK, OCTOBER 18, 2017. PIR PRESS. — “In the 2002 study on disarmament and non-proliferation education (A/57/124) the Board is encouraged “to consider periodically follow-up action related to disarmament and non-proliferation education”. The most recent consideration by the Board was in 2010. To facilitate its discussion on this occasion, the Board considered a food-for-thought paper by Board member Vladimir Orlov, who was part of the group that produced the original study in 2002. He provided an overview of the 34 recommendations and the need for follow-up at this juncture,” — Report of the UN Secretary-General on the work of the Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters.

At the ongoing 72nd session of the UN General Assembly in New York, delegations have been presented with the report of the UN Secretary-General on the work of his Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters in 2017. The report includes recommendations by the members of the Board. At the moment, the Board consists of representatives of the following fifteen countries: Australia, Chile, China, Croatia, France, Ghana, Jordan, Mongolia, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Russia, Spain, the United States, as well as the Director of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Affairs (UNIDIR). For three years now, the Founder & Special Advisor to the PIR Center, the Head of the Center for Global Trends and International Organizations of the Diplomatic Academy of the Russian Foreign Ministry, Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, has been participating in the work of the Board as a delegate of the Russian Federation.

The regular meeting of the sixty-eighth session of the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, at which the recommendations were developed, was held on June 28-30, 2017 in New York. Disarmament and nonproliferation education featured as one of the key issues discussed at the meeting: “The Board expressed concern that disarmament education is of decreasing interest among the younger generation. Even among senior policymakers there can be a lack of awareness and knowledge. People in different parts of the world have different perspectives on the disarmament agenda, different priorities (for example nuclear versus conventional disarmament) and different educational styles. Disarmament education therefore needs to be tailored to different generations, States, regions and cultures.”

As stated in the Secretary-General’s report, “In the 2002 study on disarmament and non-proliferation education (A/57/124) the Board is encouraged “to consider periodically follow-up action related to disarmament and non-proliferation education”. The most recent consideration by the Board was in 2010. To facilitate its discussion on this occasion, the Board considered a food-for-thought paper by Board member Vladimir Orlov, who was part of the group that produced the original study in 2002. He provided an overview of the 34 recommendations and the need for follow-up at this juncture”.

Based on the discussions, the Board decided that the recommendations contained in the 2002 study remain relevant and comprehensive, and therefore, the focus should be on improved implementation of the recommendations rather than on conducting a new research study. Media as well as educators in the field of disarmament and nonproliferation were in the spotlight of the discussion: “It is vital for journalists and media representatives to enhance their knowledge of disarmament and non-proliferation. That applies, in particular, to the digital media, which plays an increasingly important role today. It is also vital to “educate the educators” at the national, regional and international levels in order to achieve a multiplier effect.”

The Board also proposed that the Office for Disarmament Affairs “consider additional creative means of advancing disarmament education. That could include awards for best educators, journalists and writers in the field, the appointment of “peer ambassadors”, seminars on best practices in disarmament education and the launching of online debates.”

In June, PIR Center published an article co-authored by its Consultant Adlan Margoev and Projects Coordinator Maxim Miroshnikov titled “Nonproliferation and Disarmament – No Future Without Education”. In 2015, PIR Center’s Director Albert Zulkharneev delivered a presentation on the margins of the NPT Review Conference that covered achievements, new challenges and solutions in the field. In 2012, Albert Zulkharneev and PIR Center’s Advisory Board member Viktor Murogov co-authored an article titled “Nuclear Non-Proliferation Culture: A New Resource for Russian Public Diplomacy”.

PIR Center has traditionally placed premium on disarmament and nonproliferation education. In 2016, the first international M.A. dual-degree program in nonproliferation studies was established by the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO-University) and the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS), the United States, under PIR Center’s initiative. While the first cohort of the program is continuing their studies in Monterey, the second cohort began studying in Moscow in past September. Besides, PIR Center is organizing its annual International School on Global Security in the Russian language as well as offers internships to students and young scholars.

PIR Center is also to announce its new initiative in this field and to publish an Action plan on disarmament and nonproliferation education for the next decade.

Earlier this year, Founder and PIR Center Special Advisor Dr. Vladimir Orlov delivered lectures and also held work meetings with students and professors of regional universities in Russia, where the issues of international security and nuclear nonproliferation are the educational and research priorities – N.I. Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Novosibirsk State Technical University, Tomsk State University, Ural Federal University named after the first President of Russia B. N. Yeltsin.

Dr. Vladimir Orlov visited Nizhny Novgorod, Kazan, Novosibirsk, Tomsk, and Ekaterinburg during his cross-country trip in Russia, when we drove a car from Moscow to Transbaikal for a total of 17 thousand kilometers, visited 21 regions and more than three dozen cities of the Russian Federation. He shared his impressions from this trip on his Facebook page (in Russian).

For questions regarding the participation of Vladimir Orlov in the UN Secretary-General's Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, please contact us by phone +7 (495) 987 19 15 or via e-mail orlov at pircenter.org.

For questions related to the educational programs of PIR Center, as well as the Dual Degree Master Program in Nonproliferation Studies, you can contact PIR Center Project Coordinator, Maxim Miroshnikov by phone,+7 (495) 987 91 15, or by email, edu at percenter.org.

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