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20.04.2018

“The window of opportunity regarding US-Russian dialogue is closing very quickly. I do not accept the argument that that the transition period in Washington is taking longer than usual, and the real game will start soon. Nor do I think that just separating the nuclear nonproliferation agenda issues from the broader context of security agenda could help. This will just mislead all of us,” – Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Founder and Special Advisor, PIR Center.

10.04.2018

 “At the beginning of the 2000s, the United States informed us about their desire to withdraw from the ABM Treaty. We warned that we would have to do something to enhance our deterrent capabilities. We did not plan to build up nation-wide defense because due to the size of our country this measure would take large amount of resources and would still be ineffective. Therefore, we had to design new warheads and new armaments. On behalf of the State Department John Bolton said to us: “Do whatever you want, we do not care.” Even though President Putin demonstrated new weapons, including hypersonic ones, I do not think we are going to produce those systems in big numbers. That was a signal to the United States: if they want us to develop those weapons further, that is ok, but we prefer to stop and start talking about limitation of our systems, including missile defense,” – Gen. Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of PIR Center’s Executive Board.

02.03.2018

"The United States and Russia have managed to cooperate on nonproliferation even amid grave political crises since such cooperation always was and remains indispensable to the preservation and success of the nonproliferation regime. Whenever the two countries, divided by broader political disagreements, failed to compartmentalize their relations and keep nonproliferation dialogue intact, they would also fail to achieve common nonproliferation-related goals, something they cannot allow to happen today,” Mr. Adlan Margoev, PIR Center’s “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director.

15.02.2018

“The current state of US-Russian relations is depressive and stimulating. Depressing because there’s so little optimism in the expert community, and there’s so much concern that we are heading in the direction that neither of us really seems to want but neither of us can avoid. And that direction seems to be bringing us to the potential for conflict... That generates the commitment, which was the positive side of the discussion. We had a very pragmatic discussion. There was relatively little posturing, and there was a lot of serious direct constructive exploration of our differences,” — Dr. Brad Roberts, Director of Center for Global Security Research, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

15.12.2017

“What is happening in the United States has created a significant layer of politicians who made their career on anti-Trump, ant-Russian positions. I do not expect those particular people to change their mind anytime soon. In my view, two election cycles will have to occur in the United States to bring a new thinking. Especially taking into account that the majority of those in Congress do not care too much about Russia, and they do not know too much about Russia”, – Amb. Sergey Kislyak, First Deputy Chairperson, Committee on Foreign Affairs, Council of the Federation.

02.12.2017

“There is a proposal to start research and development [on a missile prohibited under the INF Treaty]. It is not prohibited according to the Treaty, but it seems to be the first step of violation of the soul of the Treaty. […] For us, this is an indication that activities to create a new missile violating the Treaty are going on. The United States is engaged in preparatory work to withdraw from the Treaty. We consider this to be a mistake. We have offered the United States to sit together and discuss all issues of mutual concern, find solutions to these issues, and avoid making efforts provoking the other side to give an adequate answer,” — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Russian Federation to the United States of America.

04.07.2017

“There is a whole list of key international security issues in which Russia is interested in and which are central to discussing with the United States. Is this what Trump wants? I can assume that it is. Will he be able to enter into this strategic conversation in Hamburg - I don’t think so. As of now, the format in Hamburg does not allow for all of these issues to be discussed in detail. Moreover, as far as I can see, Trump's team has not prepared all the necessary dossiers for such a full-scale dialogue yet”, — Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Head, Center for Global Trends and International Organizations, Diplomatic Academy of the Russian Foreign Ministry; Founder & Special Advisor, PIR Center.

26.06.2017

“Today, technological trends appear to validate the advocates of counterforce: remote sensing, conventional strike capabilities, anti-submarine warfare and cyberattack techniques will continue to improve and increasingly threaten strategic forces whether or not the United States seeks to maximize its counterforce capabilities. In this new era of counterforce, technological arms racing seems inevitable, so exercising restraint may limit options without yielding much benefit,” – Keir Lieber, Associate Professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and Daryl Press, Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College.

10.05.2017

“We need a successful pilot project for a new Europe, a major and ambitious one. The revival of Ukraine must and can become such a project. It should be based on three legally binding pillars”, — Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Special Advisor to PIR Center, Evgeny Sharov, Independent Ukrainian Analyst.

28.02.2017

In the new thematic issue of the Security Index Journal “New technologies and challenges to global security” — interview with Deputy Foreign Minister of Russia Sergey Ryabkov on Russia-U.S. relations, and interview with Deputy CEO of Rosatom company Sergey Saveliev on the safety of the space activity, materials of the round table on regulations of lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS), PIR Center's report on the problematic of a cybersecurity of nuclear objects, article by the Director and Vice-Director of Kurchatov institute on the possibilities and threats coming from nature-like technologies, article by the Director of UNIDIR Jarmo Sareva on the influence of the new technologies on the strategic stability, commentary from Vladimir Legoyda on the relations between religion, science and technology.

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