Chronology

The USSR agrees to withdraw medium-range bombers from Cuba and the U.S. announces the lifting of the quarantine of the island.
20.11.1962

International Security Index iSi

PIR PRESS LOGO

PIR PRESS NEWS

19.11.2019

On November 11, 2019, a meeting was held between PIR Center employees and guests with a senior researcher at the RAND Corporation Samuel Charap. The meeting was attended by: Vadim Kozyulin, Albert Zulkharneev, Oleg Shakirov, Sergey Semenov, Yulia Sych, Nikita Degtyarev, Sergey Ponamarev, Alexander Checkov.

PIR Center Director Vladimir Orlov Publishes Op-Ed in “Kommersant” image
07.11.2019

“China shows no signs at all of being ready to join the process. Of course, that could change over time. In fact, it would also be in Russia’s best interests if not just China but also France and Britain were to join in, though neither country seems to have much to say on the matter for the time being. If we choose to pursue this scenario, we should be aware that any meaningful progress would take years to achieve. Meanwhile, we are facing some urgent tasks that cannot wait. And that is why Russia and the United States should continue to work as a duo, until such time when the duo can become a trio or, even better, a quintet.”, – Director of PIR Center Vladimir Orlov.

30.10.2019

“In the year of the PIR Center 25th anniversary, it can be stated with confidence that Educational Program of the organization remains one of the most successful and demanded. Since the establishment of the program, tremendous work has been done on its development, and it remains ongoing today. For more than 20 years we have been working together with our partners to create a community of next-generation specialists in the field of WMD nonproliferation and global security”, – Director of PIR Center`s Educational Program Yulia Sych.

Working group on the NPT Review Process

Third meeting of the US-Russian Working Group on the NPT Review Process took place in Geneva, Switzerland. The event entitled “US-Russian Dialogue on the NPT Review Process: Lessons Learned (1970-2017) and Steps Ahead (2018-2020)” was organized by Centre russe d’etudes politiques, Geneve in partnership with PIR Center, Moscow, and James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey (CNS). The meeting brought together 19 experts, including former and current high-level statesmen and diplomats, as well as young researchers focused on US-Russian relations and nonproliferation issues.

The meeting was moderated by Co-Chairs of the Working Group Dr. Vladimir Orlov, Founder and Special Advisor to PIR Center, Professor of Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), and Prof. William Potter, Director of CNS and Professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. The Working Group had Dr. Alexei Arbatov, Head of the Center for International Security, Primakov National Research Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Gen. Evgeny Buzhinsky, Chairman of the PIR Center Executive Board, Thomas Countryman, Chair of the Board of the Arms Control Association, Alexander Deineko, Deputy Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations Office and other International Organizations in Geneva, Lewis Dunn, Independent Consultant, Gleb Efremov, Director General of the International Uranium Enrichment Center, Robert Einhorn, Senior Fellow at the Brookings InstitutionYuri Nazarkin, Professor of the Geneva School of Diplomacy and International Relations, member of Centre russe d’etudes politiques,  Nikolai Sokov, Senior Fellow of CNS, Gen. Vyacheslav Trubnikov, the Primakov National Research Institute of World Economy and International Relations Board Member, among its members.

The agenda of the meeting featured two main components: history of US-Soviet/Russian cooperation on nonproliferation and its lessons for the current generation, and dynamics of the 2020 NPT review cycle and recommendations for the 2018 Preparatory Committee Session in Geneva. For the historic part of the agenda, several research papers were submitted for discussion. The papers covered a variety of issues that were subject of US-Soviet/Russian dialogue: nuclear nonproliferation in South Asia, the Iranian nuclear program, START Treaty, Articles I & II of the NPT, Multilateral Nuclear Force in Europe and nuclear sharing, among others. The papers are available on PIR Center’s webpage dedicated to the “US-Russian Dialogue on Global Security” project.

An insightful part of the event was a keynote speech by Russian Senator, Deputy Head of the Federation Council’s Committee on Foreign Affairs Amb. Sergey Kislyak who shared his account of the current state of US-Russian relations and their implications on the nonproliferation regime. Former Ambassador of the Russian Federation to the United States noted that the United States “deprived itself of a very able partner that was potentially available for working together” on many issues that could unite the two countries. PIR PRESS covered this luncheon in its February 6 issue.

PIR Center’s “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director Mr. Adlan Margoev emphasized one lesson he could draw from the meeting: “The United States and Russia have managed to cooperate on nonproliferation even amid grave political crises since such cooperation always was and remains indispensable to the preservation and success of the nonproliferation regime. Whenever the two countries, divided by broader political disagreements, failed to compartmentalize their relations and keep nonproliferation dialogue intact, they would also fail to achieve common nonproliferation-related goals, something they cannot allow to happen today.”

However gloomy the situation seems to be now, there are identifiable ways to enhance US-Russian cooperation in the field of nonproliferation. This sentiment was shared by most participants of the meeting, including Senior Research Associate and Project Manager at CNS Ms. Sarah Bidgood who highlighted the role that the younger generation could play in the years to come: “The current generation of practitioners grew up during the Soviet Union when, even though arms control was successful, Russian and American university students did not interact with each other the way they do now. I do think when these students are in policy-making positions, whether in government or NGOs, it will be a huge advantage that they will have known each other for several years. They will understand each other’s positions on many issues in a way that their predecessors would not when they were young. From that standpoint, I do think that is an extra tool and advantage that we have, but on the other hand, there are only a select few of us on both American and Russian sides who are working in this environment under the current political constraints, so I worry that we are going to have our work cut out for us.”

For questions regarding the US-Russian Working Group on the NPT Review Process, please contact “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director Adlan Margoev by phone +7 (495) 987 19 15 or via e-mail margoev at pircenter.org.

loading