Chronology

North Korea conducted its second underground nuclear test
25.05.2009
First batch of Russian nuclear fuel for Kudankulam NPP was delivered to India
25.05.2008
U.S. media report that the first nuclear artillery shell has been fired.
25.05.1953
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PIR PRESS NEWS

26.05.2022

On May 26, 2022, Director of  PIR Center Dr Vladimir A. Orlov will take part in the first meeting of the strategic planning group of the Global Alliance of Leaders for Nuclear Security and Nuclear-Weapons-Free World, which will be held in Vienna, Austria.

25.05.2022

The International Dual Degree M.A. Program “Global Security, Nuclear Policy and WMD Nonproliferation”, developed jointly by PIR Center, MGIMO University and Middlebury Institute for International Studies in Monterey, USA (MIIS), is still open to new applications from young experts in global security who plan, through acquiring the master’s degree, to gain professional knowledge and skills in nuclear nonproliferation, disarmament, arms control, strategic stability, and the nuclear factor in international relations in general. Against the backdrop of aggravating US-Russian relations, interest in the Program does not fade away but continues to grow every year.

24.05.2022

On May 12, the 114th Extended Summer Session of the Trialogue Club International took place. It was dedicated to the topic “Assessing the State of Global Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime on the Eve of the X NPT Review Conference”. This time tkeynote speaker of the Session was Deputy Foreign Minister of the Russian Federation H.E. Sergey A. Ryabkov who shared his view on why currently, even among the ongoing tensions, the nuclear nonproliferation dialogue was not only possible but necessary. 

21.05.2022

"The main thing, of course, is constant work, and in two directions. On the one hand, you need to constantly hone the skills that you have, especially in our specialty. You should never forget that if you know a language, it will always be at a high level. It needs to be constantly refreshed. This is on the one hand. On the other hand, you need to learn something new all the time. I'm used to the fact that you need to continuously immerse yourself in new things, new topics, new activities. This applies to both research and practical work. The Arab East and the Middle East provide a very wide field of action for self-realization, there is always an opportunity to learn something new, so human life is not enough for this. You need to leave a memory of yourself in the profession. Getting new knowledge, mastering something is very interesting and gives an incentive to life, without which it becomes boring," - Vitaliy Naumkin, director of the Institute of Oriental Studies at the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Nuclear Nonproliferation: History in Faces (Oral History)

Unfortunately, the tradition of writing political memoirs has not taken root in Russia. As a rule, diplomats and those working for other foreign policy agencies do not leave written memories of the events they witnessed after retirement. Much of what they could share is “not put on paper,” which means that sooner or later this information will be lost.

Memories of the older generation of disarmament specialists make a significant contribution to preserving the continuity of the traditions of Russian diplomacy and foreign policy. As Russia's leading think tank in the field of international security, PIR Center strives to make its best contribution not only to overcoming current security challenges for Russia and the world, but also to preserving historically reliable information about past successes and failures. In 2021, we launched our new project "Nuclear Nonproliferation: History in Faces."

The first event within the framework of the new project was the webinar “Putsch. Orlov. Eyewitness. 3 days and 2 nights at the White House. 30 years later” (in Russian), which took place on August 19, 2021. PIR Center’s Founder and Director Vladimir Orlov, who was in Russia’s White House from August 19 to 21, 1991, as a correspondent for Moskovskiye Novosti, shared his memories.

On December 23, 2021, an expert seminar "30 years of Russian nuclear succession" was held, timed to coincide with the anniversary of the events associated with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Prominent Russian and foreign diplomats, as well as leading researchers and analysts, took spoke at the event. The participants include:

Pavel Palazhchenko, Head of the International Department of the Gorbachev Foundation, chief English interpreter for Mikhail Gorbachev and Soviet foreign minister Eduard Shevardnadze in 1985-1991.

Yuri Nazarkin, Professor at the Geneva School of Diplomacy and International Relations, Head of the Russian delegation at the negotiations on the nuclear disarmament of Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan in 1992.

Vladimir Orlov, PIR Center’s Founder and Director.

Togzhan Kassenova, Senior Fellow with the Project on International Security, Commerce, and Economic Statecraft (PISCES) at the Center for Policy Research, SUNY-Albany, Non-Resident Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, author of the forthcoming book "Atomic Steppe: How Kazakhstan Gave Up the Bomb”.

Mariana Budjeryn, Research Associate at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center, author of the forthcoming book "Inheriting the Bomb: Soviet Collapse and Nuclear Disarmament of Ukraine";

Polina Sinovets - Director of the Odessa Center for Non-Proliferation, editor of the book "Ukraine's Nuclear History."

Our distinguished included were Rose Gottemoeller, Steven C. Házy Lecturer at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, NSC’s director for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia Affairs in 1993-1994, and Alexey Obukhov, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR/Russia in 1989-1992.

Currently, we are working on the new format of oral history, which will include a series of interviews with the older generation of Russian experts in arms control, disarmament and nuclear nonproliferation: veterans of the Russian Foreign Ministry, military diplomats, nuclear scientists. The interviews will be posted on nonproliferation.ru and will be available to everyone both in Russia and abroad.

 

For questions related to the project "Nuclear Nonproliferation: History in Faces", you can contact Artem Kvartalnov, Junior Research Fellow of the Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation Program at 7 (495) 987 1915 or by e-mail [email protected]

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