Chronology

The first meeting of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG).
23.04.1975

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20.04.2018

“The window of opportunity regarding US-Russian dialogue is closing very quickly. I do not accept the argument that that the transition period in Washington is taking longer than usual, and the real game will start soon. Nor do I think that just separating the nuclear nonproliferation agenda issues from the broader context of security agenda could help. This will just mislead all of us,” – Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Founder and Special Advisor, PIR Center.

10.04.2018

 “At the beginning of the 2000s, the United States informed us about their desire to withdraw from the ABM Treaty. We warned that we would have to do something to enhance our deterrent capabilities. We did not plan to build up nation-wide defense because due to the size of our country this measure would take large amount of resources and would still be ineffective. Therefore, we had to design new warheads and new armaments. On behalf of the State Department John Bolton said to us: “Do whatever you want, we do not care.” Even though President Putin demonstrated new weapons, including hypersonic ones, I do not think we are going to produce those systems in big numbers. That was a signal to the United States: if they want us to develop those weapons further, that is ok, but we prefer to stop and start talking about limitation of our systems, including missile defense,” – Gen. Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of PIR Center’s Executive Board.

09.04.2018

“The 17 ambassadors selected in 2019 for five years will pass the richness of experience as well as their own ideas to the new, young generation, not only symbolically, but in practice… Starting from 2025, it will be up to the young and bright students or former students to provide their vision on this matter and to take the lead in promoting disarmament and nonproliferation education in their respective regions, as well as globally,” – Dr. Vladimir Orlov, PIR Center’s Founder and Special Advisor, and Mr. Adlan Margoev, PIR Center’s “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director.

Training course for university professors and research institutes staff 2013

NEW GLOBAL SECURITY REALITY: THE CHANGING NATURE OF THREATS IN THE XXI CENTURY

March 26-30 2013

From March 26-30, 2013 in Moscow, the PIR Center hosted an educational course for teachers from institutes of higher education in the CIS “The New Reality of Global Security: The Changing Nature of Threats in the 21st Century”. Program participants included faculty from 15 different universities in Russia (Vladivostok, Novosibirsk, Tyumen, Voronezh, Ekaterinburg, Moscow), Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Tadjikistan, and Kyrgyzstan who study nonproliferation and international security.

Thanks to financial support from our partners, the PIR Center was able to gather representatives from research and educational centers in the CIS for the first time in ten years in order to share information and opinions on key tendencies in nonproliferation, arms control, nuclear energy, nuclear security, global internet governance, and information security.

Orlov and Berls

In an address to the course participants, PIR Center President Vladimir Orlov noted: “Those gathered here are our colleagues – those who teach courses and write research papers on international security issues on a daily basis. Today it is important we learn how to work with a new audience. What can we give the next generation of students, diplomats, and military officers? I believe that knowledge and skills are necessary for independent and critical approaches to solving these common problems.”

Robert Berls, Director of the Moscow office for the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a partner organization of the PIR Center, said: “You have a very fascinating week ahead of you. I wish you the best of luck in your work and hope that in this week you are able to enrich your knowledge and strengthen your achievements as effective teachers and researchers in your organizations.”

Course lecturers consisted of a number of the PIR Center’s leading experts, including PIR Center President Vladimir Orlov, who presented an in-depth analysis of developments in the nonproliferation regime since 1995, of the nonproliferation policies of Russia and other CIS states, and gave an evaluation of the present state of the NPT review process.

MapPIR Center Senior Vice President Evgeny Buzhinsky highlighted issues with arms control for new types of weaponry. The theme of Senior Research Associate at the PIR Center Vadim Kozyulin’s presentation was an analysis of the recently-concluded conference on the Arms Trade Treaty (in Russian). PIR Center Board Member and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations Natalia Kalinina questioned why chemical and biological security, regardless of their true threat, remain on the periphery and get little attention in international security educational programs.

Nuclear security came up on multiple occasions. It was discussed by Director of the International Center for Nuclear Training at MEPhI Victor Murogov in the context of his talk about the current state of nuclear energy around the world, while Dr. Orlov discussed the risks of nuclear terrorism.

The Head of the International Cooperation Department at the Federal Financial Monitoring Service Alexei Petrenko presented on a very new topic, one that has yet to be incorporated into educational programs – “Problems in Countering Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing. Russia’s 2013-2014 Chairmanship of FATF.”

Another novel topic that received piqued participants' interest was PIR Center "International Information Security and Global Internet Governance" Program Coordinator Oleg Demidov's presentation on key issues in the field and approaches to their solution.

Smth

The course participants dwelled on two key regional nonproliferation issues in particular. PIR Center Research Associate Andrey Baklitsky evaluated development perspectives for nuclear energy in the Middle East, as well as the establishment of a regional WMD-free zone. Meanwhile, Vladimir Orlov shared his views on the issues surrounding Iran’s nuclear program. One of Russia’s most experienced experts, Head of the Korea and Mongolia Department in the Institute of Oriental Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) Alexander Voronstov, explained in depth the origins of the situation on the Korean peninsula.

The course also included a seminar where participants were able to share their experiences teaching disciplines related to nonproliferation and international security. The seminar was led by Ildar Akhtamzyan, Associate Professor in the International Relations and Foreign Policy department at MGIMO, and Nataliya Piskunova, an expert with the Institute for Economic Strategies.

EveryoneParticipants’ goals upon arrival in Moscow for the course included professional development, opening up new topics, becoming familiar with the opinions of Russian experts, and discussions with colleagues. Judging by the course evaluations, many of these goals came to fruition.

“The course is defined by its high-level orientation to applied questions on disarmament, nonproliferation, and security. The course content is filled to the maximum with the most current information. I would also mention the all-around presentation of materials – a combination of visual aids and lectures. The discussions also had great meaning. The students and experts came across as true professionals in their fields,” said Ivan Zolotukhin, Director of the principle educational program “International Relations,” Far East Federal University.

Vera Gavrilova, Senior Lecturer, Department of International Relations and Regional Studies, Novosibirsk State Technical University,  laid special emphasis on the opportunity of enriching contacts with colleagues from CIS states: “What sets this course apart from others is that it brings in teachers and experts from Central Asian countries, allowing for an exchange of best practices and discussion of possibilities for further partnership with these colleagues.”

Nuria Kutnaeva, Vice-President of Academic Affairs, International University in Central Asia, paid attention to the same issue: “The course was very interesting and cognitive, allowing me to update my knowledge of nuclear issues. It was remarkable to be able to take the first steps toward establishing a network of experts in nonproliferation between international relations departments.”

On the last day of the course the participants attended the Cold War museum "Bunker 42."

Pictures from the PIR Center are available on the program website, as well as on our Facebook page.

For more information regarding the PIR Center’s Education and Training Program, please contact the program director Albert Zulkharneev by phone +7 (495) 987-19-15, fax +7 (495) 987-19-14, or e-mail: zulkharneev at pircenter.org

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