Chronology

The Convention on Nuclear Safety is opened for signing.
21.09.1994
The 15 NSG member-states reach agreement on the Guiding Principles for Nuclear Exports.
21.09.1977

International Security Index iSi

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PIR PRESS NEWS

21.08.2019

Amb. Roland Timerbaev – a luminary in the field of nonproliferation, an undisputed authority, a great teacher and mentor – has passed away.


27.06.2019

“Autonomous systems are gradually displacing humans from the battlefield, and in many aspects, this can be a boon to the military, who are exposed to less risk. However, at the same time, humans transfer to artificial intelligence (AI) a part of their powers, and consequently a part of their responsibility. According to experts, neural networks will probably never learn to explain their decisions to humans. This can become a serious problem once AI is involved in such areas as intelligence, data analysis, communications and control, scenario development, and in the long run decision making.” – Director of PIR Center’s Emerging Technologies and Global Security Project Vadim Kozyulin.

12.05.2019

“The latest prepcom has two main opposite results: in two weeks it was not possible to reach consensus among the NPT members and agree on the text of recommendations for the 2020 Review Conference, but it was decided to appoint Argentinean diplomat Rafael Mariano Grossi as the Chair of the Review Conference – his formal appointment will take place at the end of 2019," Adlan Margoev, PIR Center “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director. 

"Security Index" Journal History

The Security Index was the first Russian journal to focus on international security. It has been one of the leading journals in the complicated environment since 1994.

Initially the journal was known as Yaderny Kontrol and the export control was the main topic of its issues. By the mid-2000s – and with our contribution – that problem had been solved, and the time came for us to venture into new territories.

Back then, in 1994-1995, it sometimes felt as though “being born almost the same day your country was born” was a piece of really bad luck for the journal (and for its parent, PIR Center). At the beginning of new Russia, values and ethical criteria were eroded, and NGOs specializing in international security were seen as something unnatural. Now that we have reached a hundred, it is clear that the timing was not bad luck at all; it was actually our great good fortune. It was a time of great risks, but also a time when it was right and proper to take those risks and tread new paths instead of following in other people’s footsteps.

Vladimir Orlov,

PIR Center President, Editor-in-Chief of the Security Index journal

Our journal has always been one step ahead of international trends:

* We wrote about the logical link between missile defense and nuclear reductions 14 years before the issue began to make headlines in connection with the New START treaty;

* We predicted the establishment of a zone free of nuclear weapons in Central Asia 11 years before the Treaty of Semipalatinsk was signed;

* We ran several articles about the impact of the Internet on national security back at the time when less than 1% of Russian citizens had Internet access.

There is an increasing number of issues now being discussed in Russia which used to be off-limits, such as exports of sensitive materials and technologies, security, accounting and control of nuclear materials, etc... Other problems being discussed include the situation with the ratification of the START II and the Chemical Weapons Convention, or debates over the Russian nuclear weapons stationed in Ukraine. [...] There is a clear need for a truly professional publication targeted at both the expert community and the general public.

 Yuri Baturin,

the Advisor to the President of Russia on National Security, in his foreword to the first issue of the Yaderny Kontrol journal (November 1994)

We have published articles by presidents and foreign ministers, NATO secretaries-general and IAEA directors-general. The network of experts who have appeared on our pages spreads from Buenos Aires to Harare.

In addition to our core subjects of nuclear nonproliferation and disarmament, our authors have analyzed:

* the impact of biotechnologies on agriculture;

* the efforts by the Caspian nations to preserve the stocks of sturgeon;

* the outlook for the Cuban and Myanmar nuclear programs;

* the threat of climate change;

* the ethical conundrums of nuclear weapons.

 One important distinction of Yadernyy Kontrol, which remains to this day, is that the journal's editorial team is quite small. The job required versatile and creative people - and that is exactly the kind of people PIR Center is good at bringing up.

Vadim Kozyulin, PIR Center Senior Research Fellow, member of the Yadernyy Kontrol editorial team in 1994

The Security Index has its name since 2007. The readers in the Russian Foreign Ministry and the US Department of State, the Embassy of Sri Lanka in France and the PRC State Council, the Russian Defense Ministry and the Pentagon, the Russian Cabinet and the US Presidential Administration, as well as universities, colleges and research centers all around the world read the journal quarterly.

In response to our articles we receive letters from international organizations, ministries and governments of foreign countries. That is the kind of soft power which many countries are trying – often with little success - to acquire.

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