Chronology

The Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement between the U.S. and the IAEA to cover several nuclear facilities in the U.S. is signed.
18.11.1977

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PIR PRESS NEWS

13.11.2018

“The history of ‘Russian Kauai’ hooked me with the fact that there is so much involved: the geopolitics of the early nineteenth century, sea otters, China, St. Petersburg’s ‘decision-making’, Boston captains and Hawaiian intrigue. There is of course Fort Elizabeth, where you can imagine the Russian flag being raised on May 21st, 1816 in the presence of a huge number of Kauaians. The adventures. The romance. The beauty of the ‘Russian’ Hanalei valley. Even the humble river Hanapepe, which received a new name: ‘Don’” – PIR Center founder, Head of the Center for Global Trends and International Organizations, Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, MGIMO Professor Vladimir Orlov.

22.10.2018

“Everything points to the fact that the New START will follow the fate of the INF Treaty, and the whole system of arms control will cease to exist. But I think it is not going to be like that for long. Sooner or later, the United States will come to the same conclusion they reached in the late 60s: when it comes to nuclear weapons, predictability is even more important than arms reductions. Considering that the United States and Russia already have experience in providing predictability in this area, it will be necessary to return to it,” – Gen. Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of the PIR Center Executive Board.

11.10.2018

“We have only two arms control treaties left, and I hope that the New START will be extended. What would an arms control regime look like after the New START expires? It is necessary to impose limitations upon the missile defense system because, following the American logic during the 60s, ABM turns to be a weapon of a potential aggressor. It is useless and impossible to include everything in one treaty, but the restrictions on offensive and defensive arms, including space-based ones will have to be the key elements of a future arms control architecture,” – Gen. Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of the PIR Center Executive Board.

Application Checklist


Admissions

The MIIS / MGIMO Dual Degree is open to applicants of all nationalities, including those with little or no professional experience.

 

Entry Requirements

Bachelor’s degree in any field. Applicants may apply in the same year they obtain their degree.

● Excellent academic records from previous studies, including a minimum 3.0 GPA from an accredited undergraduate institution.

● Proficiency in English is required. Preferred minimum scores: IELTS 6.5 TOEFL 79 (IBT) or equivalent.

● Proficiency in Russian is welcome but not required.

 

Application Checklist

Applicants must submit the following documents* to the Middlebury Institute:

● Application form and application fee

● Transcripts from previous undergraduate and, if applicable, graduate degrees

● Statement of purpose

● Résumé or curriculum vitae

● Letters of recommendation (one required, two preferred)

● Official TOEFL or IELTS scores (for nonnative English speakers)

● GREs are not required but are highly recommended

* All documents have to be submitted in English

 

How to Apply

Applicants who wish to commence their studies in the fall must complete an application form by July 15 (for those who need Russian visa) and by August (for those who do not need Russian visa). All applications should be submitted to the Middlebury Institute. To apply:

1) Visit MIIS new online application form.

2) Under “which program are you applying for?” select Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies.

3) On the following screen there will be a drop down; select MIIS / MGIMO Dual MA.

 

APPLY

 

 

 


Tuition Fee and Scholarship Opportunities

Tuition fee is 50 000 US dollars for 2 years.

MIIS offers scholarships, which in practice reduce the cost of tuition up to 50%. They are available for students of any citizenship.

Student loans sponsored by the U.S. government are available for U.S. citizens.

On the base of agreement between MGIMO and Sberbank, educational loans with state support are available for Russian citizens.

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