Chronology

The Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement between the U.S. and the IAEA to cover several nuclear facilities in the U.S. is signed.
18.11.1977

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13.11.2018

“The history of ‘Russian Kauai’ hooked me with the fact that there is so much involved: the geopolitics of the early nineteenth century, sea otters, China, St. Petersburg’s ‘decision-making’, Boston captains and Hawaiian intrigue. There is of course Fort Elizabeth, where you can imagine the Russian flag being raised on May 21st, 1816 in the presence of a huge number of Kauaians. The adventures. The romance. The beauty of the ‘Russian’ Hanalei valley. Even the humble river Hanapepe, which received a new name: ‘Don’” – PIR Center founder, Head of the Center for Global Trends and International Organizations, Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation, MGIMO Professor Vladimir Orlov.

22.10.2018

“Everything points to the fact that the New START will follow the fate of the INF Treaty, and the whole system of arms control will cease to exist. But I think it is not going to be like that for long. Sooner or later, the United States will come to the same conclusion they reached in the late 60s: when it comes to nuclear weapons, predictability is even more important than arms reductions. Considering that the United States and Russia already have experience in providing predictability in this area, it will be necessary to return to it,” – Gen. Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of the PIR Center Executive Board.

11.10.2018

“We have only two arms control treaties left, and I hope that the New START will be extended. What would an arms control regime look like after the New START expires? It is necessary to impose limitations upon the missile defense system because, following the American logic during the 60s, ABM turns to be a weapon of a potential aggressor. It is useless and impossible to include everything in one treaty, but the restrictions on offensive and defensive arms, including space-based ones will have to be the key elements of a future arms control architecture,” – Gen. Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of the PIR Center Executive Board.

Careers and Internship Opportunities

Internship Opportunities

Students may spend their fourth semester in the United States, Russia, or another location. They are expected to do an internship of at least 12-weeks duration. MGIMO, MIIS, and PIR Center will assist with internship placement, including the possibility of intern positions in government agencies, international organizations, and think tanks. Possible international organizations for internship placement include the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA), the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

 

Careers in Nonproliferation, Nuclear Energy, and Security

Students will gain skills they can apply immediately, while they are still in school. When students graduate they will become part of the worldwide networks of MIIS and MGIMO alumni. These networks will open doors wherever they go.

They pursue careers in governments, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), international organizations, and the private sector. Others who have an interest in an academic career go on to obtain doctorates at major research universities.

 

Nikita Perfilyev

Intern and research fellow in PIR Center (2006–2010), PhD student in MGIMO (2007), and graduate of the MA in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies program at MIIS (2008–2011). Currently officer in the capacity building and training section at the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). 

“If PIR Center’s Nonproliferation Summer School gave me a taste of the subject then a master’s degree from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) was a gateway to the world of multilateral diplomacy and international organizations working in the field of nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. In Monterey I received world-class training in nuclear policy issues, which allowed me to join the CTBTO at the professional level with minimal adjustment time. The practical focus of curricula at MIIS enabled me to contribute to solving challenges facing the CTBTO from day one of my work. Although I had to choose between continuing my studies at MGIMO and going to Monterey, with the new PIR Center-MGIMO-Monterey dual degree program there is no need to compromise anymore. The joint degree will provide an opportunity for students studying in Russia to benefit from experience of all three partners”
 

Sarah Bidgood

MANPTS ’16, graduate of the PIR Center School on Global Security 

Participating in the PIR Center’s Security School was a truly unique opportunity. Not only was it a chance for me to learn about the Russian perspective on issues critical to global security, but it allowed me to interact on a personal level with Russian and Russian-speaking peers. My fellow participants could not have been more welcoming or more interested in my opinion on the current state of affairs. The lasting friendships I cultivated on the trip give me hope that my generation will be able to overcome diplomatic tensions and work cooperatively together in our future careers. I am incredibly grateful for this opportunity.
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