Chronology

South African President F. De Klerk ends development of nuclear weapons and eliminates available nuclear devices.
26.02.1990
The Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency enters into force.
26.02.1987
The USSR resumes nuclear tests, citing a lack of action on its initiatives by other nuclear weapons states, primarily the U.S.
26.02.1987
The USSR decides to create thermonuclear weapons.
26.02.1951

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PIR PRESS NEWS

20.02.2020

“As a journalist I know well how much more open and straight forward officials are when in an off the record modus. The upcoming discussions within the Trialogue Club International format in 2020 will give us all – so I hope – the possibility to better and deeper understand Russia’s foreign and security policy, to ask frank questions and get sincere answers”, - Dr. Elena V. Chernenko, Co-Chair, Trialogue Club International, PIR Center Executive Board member, Deputy Foreign Editor, Kommersant Daily.

 

 

17.02.2020

“The program is tailored to people with a very specific interest in nuclear issues. Getting to work with people who had been very active in the field of nonproliferation, both on the Russian and American side, is an opportunity few students get”, Dual Degree Master`s Program student Collin MacDowell.

10.02.2020

"Strategic stability in its classical sense – understood as a state of US- Russian relations under which neither side has incentives to launch a first nuclear strike – was developed during the Cold War", - a consultant at PIR Center Andrey Baklitskiy

This paper has been produced for the joint PIR Center – CSIS project “Reducing nuclear risks during Great Powers Competition”. We thank our partners in CSIS for their cooperation and support for this publication

Conventional Arms Control in Europe

Modernization of the conventional arms control regime in Europe (CACE) has been a pressing issue since 2007, when Russia withdrew from the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE Treaty). A number of Russian experts’ opinions on the subject are outlined in detail in the September 2012 issue of the PIR Center’s Study Papers “Conventional Arms Control in Europe – the End of a Regime or to be Continued?” by Russian Deputy Minister of Defense and PIR Center Advisory Board Member Anatoly Antonov andindependent expert Rodion Ayumov.

Having fulfilled its main task – to liquidate surplus of conventional arms – the CFE Treaty started to increasingly transform into a tool of collective control over Russian armed forces and of discriminatory limitations. Therefore setting a moratorium on the operation of the treaty was a consistent decision of Russian leadership and did not come unexpectedly for other parties. What comes next? Now it is apparent that there can be no return neither to the CFE Treaty of 1990, nor to the Agreement of its Adaptation of 1999, and authors are candid about it. Equally, there can also be no return to flank limitations for Russia in any form, even reduced.

In response to Russia’s concerns about deployment of missile defense system in Europe our western partners emphasize openness and transparency. Maybe the same approach should be taken in the sphere of conventional arms? PIR Center experts try to answer the question within the framework of this Project.

Publications:

1. Vienna Document, Confidence-building Measures in the Security Field and Control over Conventional Forces (in Russian), a speech by Ltn-Gen. Evgeny Buzhinsky at the Plenary Session of the OSCE Security Cooperation Forum, Vienna, February 13, 2013

2. Conventional Arms Control in Europe: the End of the Regime or to be Continued? PIR Center Study Papers: Russia and Global Security

3. Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty: What Is Russia Trying to Achieve? Russia Confidential, №4, 2011

4. The CFE Treaty - Yesterday, Today... Tomorrow?.. (in Russian) Indeks Bezopasnosti, № 1 (96), 2011

5. The CFE Treaty - Yesterday, Today... Tomorrow?.. (in Russian) Indeks Bezopasnosti, № 2 (97), 2011

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