Chronology

Entry into force of the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism
07.07.2007

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06.07.2020

The present occasional paper seeks to provide a comprehensive analysis of the key provisions of the Basic Principles of State Policy of the Russian Federation on Nuclear Deterrence and put them into perspective, while also drawing on the 2014 Military Doctrine. The “Basic Principles” is considered as a development of major importance since it is the first time in Russian history that such a detailed nuclear policy planning document is released publicly, and the room for misinterpretation of Russian nuclear policy is narrowed.

29.06.2020

PIR Center continues to publish policy papers, which were prepared for a joint seminar on reducing nuclear risks during great power competition, which was co-organized together with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). As it appears that such competition is already underway, we decided to release two policy memos originally prepared for the seminar under one cover “Strategic (In)Stability: Perspectives from the U.S.”. As discussed by the authors, there is some overlooked potential for constructive engagement between Russian and the United States with regards to arms control and emerging technologies.

22.06.2020

«Active involvement of the organizing partners, academic advisors, and instructors of the Dual Degree Master`s Program allows us to maintain a high level, dynamics, and quality of the educational process. Students of the program continue to show impressive results, and the recent master's thesis defense is a good confirmation of that», – Educational Program Director of PIR Center Yulia Sych.

Crimean crisis and the nuclear weapons

On December 5, 1994 Ukraine, the USA, Russia and the United Kingdom signed a Memorandum on Security Assurances in connection with the accession of Ukraine to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Budapest Memorandum). According to the memorandum Ukraine acquired a nuclear-free status in exchange for a series of guarantees for the sovereignty and security.

The status and relevance of the Budapest Memorandum acquired special significance in late February - early March 2014, in connection with the situation in Crimea, which has not recognized the new government in Kiev and has announced plans to join Russia.

 

Materials:

The US-Russia-Ukraine Trilateral Statement (Moscow, January 14, 1994)

"Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin informed President Kravchuk that the United States and Russia are prepared to provide security assurances to Ukraine.  In particular, once the START I Treaty enters into force and Ukraine becomes a non-nuclear-weapon  state party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty  (NPT)"

Full text of the Statement

 

Memorandum on Security Assurances in connection with Ukraine’s accession to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Budapest, 5 December 1994)

"The United States of America, the Russian Federation, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, reaffirm their obligation to refrain from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of Ukraine, and that none of their weapons will ever be used against Ukraine except in self-defense or otherwise in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations."

Full text of the Memorandum


Excerpts from Russian President Vladimir Putin’s press-conference with Russian journalists on the situation in Ukraine (Moscow, March 4, 2014)

"And if it is a revolution, what does it mean? Then I cannot but agree with some of our experts, who believe that a new state was created in this territory. Just as it was after the collapse of the Russian Empire, after 1917, we saw a new state emerge. And with that state and in respect to the state, we have not signed any binding documents."

Full text


Leading experts discuss the Ukrainian Issue at the Trialogue meeting

"Events of the night from February 21 to 22 changed not only the Russian foreign policy but, to my mind, relations between Russia and the West and deeply influenced international relations. Russia stopped its geopolitical retreat and shifted from passivity, not only in Ukrainian issue, but in its foreign policy generally, to active approach"

Full text of the news article

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