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30.12.2019

Wishing you a joyous 2020!

May you find peace, stability and success. Let’s welcome the new year with a new hope together.

Vladimir Mau celebrates 60th anniversary! image
29.12.2019

Vladimir Aleksandrovich Mau celebrates his 60th anniversary! His name is well-known to everyone who studies “Applied economics” in Russia.

27.12.2019

"Russia’s vision of arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation issues remains in fact very conventional. It is pragmatic and realistic. We do not feel “constrained by traditional formats and diplomatic protocol”. On the contrary, we strongly believe that in many cases using proven formats and keeping to well-established diplomatic routine is the best way to address and resolve outstanding international issues of today and tomorrow. From our point of view, this “traditionalist” – or maybe “no-nonsense” – approach might be helpful for preventing turning serious and solution-oriented professional discussions aimed at achieving substantive results into road-shows with uncertain purpose, random participation and no clear mandate", – Sergey RyabkovDeputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation. 

Crimean crisis and the nuclear weapons

On December 5, 1994 Ukraine, the USA, Russia and the United Kingdom signed a Memorandum on Security Assurances in connection with the accession of Ukraine to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Budapest Memorandum). According to the memorandum Ukraine acquired a nuclear-free status in exchange for a series of guarantees for the sovereignty and security.

The status and relevance of the Budapest Memorandum acquired special significance in late February - early March 2014, in connection with the situation in Crimea, which has not recognized the new government in Kiev and has announced plans to join Russia.

 

Materials:

The US-Russia-Ukraine Trilateral Statement (Moscow, January 14, 1994)

"Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin informed President Kravchuk that the United States and Russia are prepared to provide security assurances to Ukraine.  In particular, once the START I Treaty enters into force and Ukraine becomes a non-nuclear-weapon  state party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty  (NPT)"

Full text of the Statement

 

Memorandum on Security Assurances in connection with Ukraine’s accession to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Budapest, 5 December 1994)

"The United States of America, the Russian Federation, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, reaffirm their obligation to refrain from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of Ukraine, and that none of their weapons will ever be used against Ukraine except in self-defense or otherwise in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations."

Full text of the Memorandum


Excerpts from Russian President Vladimir Putin’s press-conference with Russian journalists on the situation in Ukraine (Moscow, March 4, 2014)

"And if it is a revolution, what does it mean? Then I cannot but agree with some of our experts, who believe that a new state was created in this territory. Just as it was after the collapse of the Russian Empire, after 1917, we saw a new state emerge. And with that state and in respect to the state, we have not signed any binding documents."

Full text


Leading experts discuss the Ukrainian Issue at the Trialogue meeting

"Events of the night from February 21 to 22 changed not only the Russian foreign policy but, to my mind, relations between Russia and the West and deeply influenced international relations. Russia stopped its geopolitical retreat and shifted from passivity, not only in Ukrainian issue, but in its foreign policy generally, to active approach"

Full text of the news article

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