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27.11.2020

International security is not a center of the world, but a reflection of profound processes that nowadays are characterized by a growing randomness and shrinking planning horizon. Confidence, privacy and confidentiality of diplomacy are deteriorating. Ensuring security requires not only technical, but also political decisions. Under such circumstances the aim of the Russian foreign policy is to find a balance between development and security amidst an incoming new wave of globalization. To secure its status of a great power, Russia needs to preserve its relevance among other players and play a role of additional element to the situation of unsteady equilibrium.

06.10.2016

"The School gives the opportunity to gain knowledge on the most topical issues of international security, to meet the leading Russian and foreign experts, establish useful contacts and networks, which will come in handy in the future. The practice of offsite schools with the international team of participants and lecturers is undoubtedly worth continuing; experience, gained in the School, is priceless "- Vladimir Kim, post-graduate student, Moscow State University.

27.09.2016

"Today, solving practical issues of security we are confronted with fundamental issues of human nature, society, politics and law. Under these conditions, it is important for an expert to be able to go beyond one’s field. Therefore, in the school, we bring together scientists, diplomats, military officers, nuclear scientists, and lawyers, so that in the course of combined trainings and by communicating with each other and with key experts, participants and the organizers of the School open new opportunities for themselves and their activities", - Albert Zulkharneev, Director, PIR Center.

31.08.2016

“The entire European security system, including its military dimension, should be modernized. Here it may be reasonable to come back to Russia’s proposal to draft a comprehensive European Security Treaty, once put forward by the Russian President Dmitry Medvedev. This document could embrace all security dimensions, including the military one, restore the  system  of  control, which  is in  fact lost  now,  over conventional  armed  forces, and  dramatically  improve  the  system  of  confidence- and security-building measures”, – Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of the PIR Center’s Executive Board.

29.01.2016

“In Syria, we have witnessed the attempts of at least two new centers of power – Turkey and Saudi Arabia – to pursue their geopolitical goals by means of force. Subsequently, Iran too began to display its geopolitical ambitions in the Syrian theater. The activation of power centers constitutes a phenomenon that by far extends the field of the broader Middle East.  Other countries – taking into account, of course, their actual capabilities and the conditions under which they operate – pursue a similar policy, such as Poland, India, Brazil and Iran. In the near future, assuming a stabilization of the economic situation, Indonesia and Egypt will also begin to pursue such a policy,” – Dmitry Efstafyev, member of the PIR Center Executive Board.

30.11.2015

“Russia has to rethink many things in relations with Turkey, including in terms of security. It would be extremely naive to assume that the new Turkish long-term development direction will manifest itself only in Syria” — Dmitry Evstafiev, member of PIR Center Executive Board, professor of the Higher School of Economics.


28.07.2015

“I’m glad to pass the baton to a new team today, the team who made this issue and is already preparing the next one.  A part of this team grew up within the PIR Center’s walls, and another is entirely new. At the head of this team stands Olga Mostinskaya – the new Editor-in-Chief of Security Index, whom I present with pleasure to our readers today, and to whom I wish creative motivation and insightful dialogue with our wonderful authors and demanding (which is great!) readers.” – Member of the Security Index Editorial Board Vladimir Orlov.

29.04.2015

The new issue of Security Index journal offers several predictions for the development of international security. First of all, during the round table "Russia, challenges to its security and answers: expectations for 2014 and reality–2015"  Dmitry Trenin, Dmitry Evstafiev, Armen Oganesyan, Vadim Kozyulin and Andrei Suzdaltsev, someone a year ago, someone a little more – have given us their predictions about what threats and challenges Russia will face and how she will react to them. And now in the spring of 2015, they don't just look at their own predictions of that absolutely unpredictable year, but also offer their views in 2015.   

03.03.2015

The latest issue of the Global edition of Security Index journal summarizes key events in the field of global security over the second half of 2014 and even looks further ahead to 2015. It focuses on the ups and downs of the nuclear nonproliferation pays attention to a coming milestone event – the 2015 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT).

26.01.2015

The latest issue of the Security Index journal is partly devoted to the development of the global nuclear energy sector and nuclear infrastructure. Against the backdrop of the oil-and-gas needle and amid the continued devaluation of the Russian currency, the Russian nuclear energy sector seems to offer what may well be the only tangible, comprehensive, and carefully thought-out answer to economic upheavals. This particular branch of the Russian high-tech sector is not a prototype but a working engine.

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